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Google Offers Refunds After Smart Glasses Stop Working

Google Offers Refunds After Smart Glasses Stop Working. Smart glasses company North told customers that their $600 purchases will stop working in a few day’s time. It said it will automatically refund all customers. It announced it was being acquired by Google, and would not release a planned second-generation device.

Google Offers Refunds After Smart Glasses Stop Working

However, the focal glasses feature prescription lenses as an option, which means that they can function as everyday prescription eyewear. The frames, battery, housing a laser, and other kits will no longer do anything that regular spectacles can’t do.

Tech giant (Google) made an early but ill-fated attempt to make smart glasses mainstream with its glass production back in 2013. Go through the section below to get the detail from the BBC blog.

Google Offers Refunds After Smart Glasses Stop Working

According to BBC, North was a Canadian company and was recently purchased by Google. The company says that its focal glasses will cease functioning on Friday. Owners will not be able to make use of the glasses or connect to the companion app. But it says it will refund all customers.

However, it promised to send the purchase price back to the original payment method and to contact those customers whose refunds it could not process.

As of June end, North announced it was being acquired by Google and would not launch a planned second-generation device.

It also said it would “wind-down” its first-generation smart glasses, released last year. The customer found out that meant the smart glasses would be rendered dumb through a statement published on the company’s website and by email.

The focal glasses come with prescription lenses as an option, meaning they can work as daily prescription eyewear. Thus, the bulky frames, housing a laser, battery, and other kits no longer do anything that regular spectacles can’t do. The chief analyst at CCS Insight, Ben wood said that the pulling of features from cloud-powered hardware is not uncommon and something that has happened to him before. He warned “ if you want to be an early adopter and have some fun new tech that an ambitious startup has created, there’s always a risk that they won’t be able to make the business plan stack up.  That could either mean the service stops working or you end up finding you have to pay additional charges to maintain services continuity.”

There are lots of examples of internet-enabled smart devices that are suddenly rendered, losing many features or even becoming unusable when the company changes Its business model.

Moreover, Google made an early but ill bill fated attempt to make smart glasses mainstream with its Google glass products in 2013.

When Google bought North, it said that the offer of a full refund for North customers is exceptionally generous and the best approach from a customer relations point of view.

“For Google, given the small number of North glasses that were actually sold to real end-users, its rounding error.”

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