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Peloton Appears To Have Removed QAnon-related Hashtags From Its Platform

Peloton Appears To Have Removed QAnon-related Hashtags From Its Platform. Peloton according to Wikipedia is an American exercise equipment and media company. It was founded in 2012 by Graham Stanton, Hisao Kushi, John Foley, Tom Cortese, and Yony Feng. And launched with help from a Kickstarter funding campaign in 2013.

Peloton Appears To Have Removed QAnon-related Hashtags From Its Platform

The firm is based in New York City. Thus, its main products include a stationary bicycle and treadmill that allow users to remotely participate in classes that are streamed from the company’s fitness studio and are paid for using a monthly subscription service. Its popularity started from its now celebrity fitness instructors, such as Robin Arzon, Ally love, Cody Rigsby, Jess King, Jenn Sherman, Kendall Toole, and Ben Alldis.

The company appears to have taken out QAnon-related hashtags from their platform. Check out the section under for the detail from the Verge website.

Peloton Appears To Have Removed QAnon-related Hashtags From Its Platform

According to The Verge, social media sites like Facebook and Twitter have tried to crack down on the false conspiracy theory. Business Insider reported that the company (Peloton) has removed several hashtags related to the QAnon conspiracy theory from its virtual exercise platform. The move followed a tweet from a. Washington Post editor earlier in the week that showed several hashtags, which lets people taking the same online fitness classes to connect with each other, thus, making use of variants of QAnon’s “Where we go 1 we go all” hashtag.

However, a Peloton spokesperson told BI that the company has “a zero-tolerance policy against hateful content” and removed the QAnon hashtags for violating that policy.

QAnon is a false conspiracy theory that claims among other things that President Donald Trump is secretly planning to arrest high-profile democratic politicians and celebrities for pedophilia or cannibalism, and also that he sends them coded messages about his plans. It grew across social media platforms, and several QAnon followers have been accused of violent acts.

Moreover, other social media platforms have also tried to keep QAnon content from proliferating. In the past week Facebook completely banned QAnon and labeled it a “militarized social movement,” and Etsy banned all QAnon merchandise saying the products violated its policies against promoting hate and violence. Twitter also cracked down on QAnon content.

Thus, with gyms closed due to the covid-19 pandemic and more people working out from home, Peloton has seen sales of its exercise bikes and treadmills surge year to year, although the firm has sometimes struggled to keep up with demand. Peloton did not reply to a request for comment Saturday immediately.

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