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Students Are Taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class, And Startups Are Scooping Them Up

Students Are Taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class, And Startups Are Scooping Them Up. As reported in an article published on Bloomberg About 2.5% of colleges are planning a fully in-person semester this upcoming year. For students, rather than spend a year starring at Zoom, some of these students are considering taking the semester off. According to Boomberg.com, “Startups sees this as an opportunity to recruit these students into virtual fall internships”  continue reading to see more details on this topic: Students Are Taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class, And Startups Are Scooping Them Up.

Students Are Taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class, And Startups Are Scooping Them Up

Students Are Taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class, And Startups Are Scooping Them Up

From the outcome of students taking Gap Years To Avoid Online Class. Some firms are organizing virtual career fairs, compiling lists of potential employers, and offering grants to teams of entrepreneurs. Others are extending the terms of their summer cohorts. Postmates told Bloomberg that it may keep some interns on if they take time off school as reported by The Verge.

Also, startups are hoping to complete for top students. The virtual nature of the internships could allow the firms access to a nationwide talent pool. And companies hoe that potential employees they hook this fall might stay on the years to come, rather than taking spots at large tech companies. Nick Schrock, CEO of developer tools startup Elemental, told Bloomberg. “A great intern who has a great network can often yield compounded returns later down the lines.”

The Impact of Covid-19 on The Educational System

It’s easy to see why a remote internship might tempt many college students at a time when COVID-19 is turning higher education upside down. A number of schools that announced they would be operating in-person classes earlier this summer are now walking back those plans, with many abruptly canceling the on-campus housing they’d previously promised and urging students (some of whom had already signed leases and moved into off-campus apartments) not to return.

Some universities that have opened have already had to take steps to contain the virus. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which is offering primarily in-person classes and has praised its community for “excellent compliance on campus,” has reported four clusters of COVID-19 in student housing, including a student dorms, a fraternity, and a private apartment complex.

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